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UPA Jolly Frolics DVD

SKU ID #364906

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  • Technical Specs
  • Format: DVD - Boxed Set
  • Rating: Not Rated
  • Number of Discs: 3
  • Region: 1 Region?
  • Studio: TURNER CLASSIC (CON)
  • DVD Release Date: May 17, 2012
  • Audio: ENGLISH: Stereo
  • Color: Color
  • Includes:

    Digital Bonus Features on the DVD Include:
    • Introduction by Leonard Maltin
    • Audio Commentaries by Leonard Maltin & Jerry Beck
    • Digital Image Gallery
      - UPA Studio Art
      - Model Sheets
      - Concept Paintings
      - Storyboards
      - Background Paintings
      - and more!
Turner Classic Movies and Sony Pictures Home Entertainment present the UPA Jolly Frolics Collection.

This three-disc set includes 38 theatrical cartoons from the most critically-acclaimed cartoon studio of the 1950s. Presented for the first time on DVD, these classic cartoons have been re-mastered - with as many of the original theatrical titles restored as possible - making the collection a desirable addition to any animation and classic movie fan’s DVD library. Released theatrically by Columbia Pictures, the cartoon shorts produced by UPA (United Productions of America) were revolutionary, adopting the contemporary graphics of Modern design and offering non-traditional, provocative storytelling. Giving the animators at Disney, MGM and Warner Bros. a run for their money, UPA earned six nominations and three Academy Awards®, and among their classic one-shot cartoons they adapted stories by James Thurber (A Unicorn in the Garden) and Edgar Allan Poe (The Tell-Tale Heart narrated by James Mason). The studio tried to avoid repetition, but nevertheless presented two long-lasting characters in Gerald McBoing Boing (created by Dr. Seuss) and the near-sighted Mr. Magoo, whose first cartoon - Ragtime Bear – is also included in the UPA Jolly Frolics Collection.

ROBIN HOODLUM (1948)
The King appoints the Crow to be the new Sheriff of Nottingham and demands that he catch the outlaw Robin Hood (played by the Fox.)

THE MAGIC FLUKE (1949)
When dance band leader Lips Fox leaves his drummer (the Crow) behind to become Foxini, the highfalutin conductor at Corneggy Hall, his former partner gives him a magician’s magic wand to use as a conductor’s baton.

RAGTIME BEAR (1949)
In the first Mr. Magoo cartoon, the near-sighted Magoo mistakes a banjo-playing bear for his nephew Waldo while vacationing at the Hodge Podge Lodge.

PUNCHY DE LEON (1950)
In 1503, the King of Spain posts a reward for proof of the Fountain of Youth, so the Fox and the Crow travel to Florida to retrieve it.

THE MINER’S DAUGHTER (1950)
Clementine, the daughter of a crusty gold prospector, falls for John Harvard, who stakes a claim too close for daddy’s comfort.

GIDDYAP (1950)
Jack the horse pulls an ice wagon but reminisces about his glory days in show business as “Jack the Hoofer” and tries for a comeback.

THE POPCORN STORY (1950)
The adventures of farm boy/inventor Wilbur Shucks, and his blundering into the discovery of popcorn, are recounted.

THE FAMILY CIRCUS (1951)
Little Patsy causes all manner of havoc in her household due to her jealousy of the attention Daddy devotes to her baby brother, Butch.

GERALD McBOING BOING (1951)
UPA adapts a story written by Dr. Suess for a children’s record; when Gerald McBoing Boing begins to talk, it is not in words but in sound effects. Picked on at school, he runs away from home.

GEORGIE AND THE DRAGON (1951)
A young Scottish lad named Georgie finds a baby dragon on the shoreline, takes it home, and plans to ask his father Angus if he can adopt it as a pet.

WONDER GLOVES (1951)
A janitor stumbles upon a pair of magical boxing gloves that give him the edge he needs to become a champion fighter.

THE OOMPAHS (1952)
Mr. Oompah is a serious-minded tuba, while his son Orville is just a little horn that likes to jazz it up with his other instrument friends.

ROOTY TOOT TOOT (1952)
"Frankie & Johnny" is retold as a courtroom case set to a swinging jazz score.

WILLIE THE KID (1952)
Modern suburbia is overrun by the neighborhood preschoolers acting out a violent Western scenario, six-shooters blazing before naptime.

PETE HOTHEAD (1952)
Pete Hothead has ordered a radio as a present for his wife, and when a package containing a parrot arrives at the house, Pete storms off to the department store to complain.

MADELINE (1952)
An adaptation of Ludwig Bemelmans' classic children's book, narrated by Gladys Holland, about "twelve little girls in two straight lines” and the smallest and most adventurous of them, Madeline.

LITTLE BOY WITH A BIG HORN (1953)
Little Ollie disturbs his parents and everyone in town when he practices playing his tuba, resulting in the formation of the “Stop Ollie” committee.

THE EMPEROR’S NEW CLOTHES (1953)
In this retelling of the Hans Christian Andersen story, the Emperor has nothing to wear for the upcoming parade and is offered a new garment woven with cloth that is invisible to those who are “unusually stupid.”

CHRISTOPHER CRUMPET (1953)
Christopher Crumpet wants a rocketship – a REAL rocketship, mind you – and whenever he doesn’t get his way, he turns into a chicken.

GERALD McBOING BOING’S SYMPHONY (1953)
Gerald the noisemaking boy works at the KZX radio network, where his talents at sound effects are put to the test when a full symphony orchestra fails to show up as scheduled.

THE UNICORN IN THE GARDEN (1953)
In this adaptation of the story by James Thurber, a meek husband sees a unicorn in his garden one sunny morning and his shrewish wife tries to get him thrown in the “booby hatch.”

THE TELL-TALE HEART (1953)
James Mason narrates this dark adaptation of the Edgar Allan Poe story of murder and madness.

BRINGING UP MOTHER (1954)
John Smith recounts the trials and tribulations of childhood, such as getting a baby brother when he was promised a sister.

BALLET-OOP (1954)
Mr. Hotfoot announces to the patient instructor of his School of Ballet that she has but three weeks to prepare four new pupils for an important upcoming Ballet Festival.

THE MAN ON THE FLYING TRAPEZE (1954)
Downtrodden Wesley loses the affections of his girlfriend Fifi to dashing trapeze artist The Great Alonzo, daredevil of the canvas top.

FUDGET’S BUDGET (1954)
George and Irene Fudget find themselves underwater after they have trouble keeping to their household budget.

HOW NOW McBOING BOING (1954)
The parents of Gerald McBoing Boing bring their boy to see Professor Joyce, teacher of voice, who is determined to teach Gerald to say “how now brown cow.”

SPARE THE CHILD (1955)
Junior makes a birthday wish to trade sizes with his father, so the discipline issues of the household are reversed.

FOUR WHEELS, NO BRAKE (1955)
Pete Hothead’s wife wins a new purple car in a contest while Pete puts a down payment on a new red Widgeon; thinking the dealership has made a mistake upon delivery, Pete blows his stack and returns it.

BABY BOOGIE (1955)
A little girl wants to know where babies come from; when her daddy tells her “the hospital,” she goes there to get the scoop.

CHRISTOPHER CRUMPET’S PLAYMATE (1955)
Marvin and Abigail Crumpet won’t allow little Christopher to have a dog, but they will allow him to have an “imaginary” playmate: Webster the Elephant.

THE RISE OF DUTON LANG (1955)
Rotund chemistry genius Duton Lang lives in his basement laboratory and creates a chemical concoction that, when sprinkled on food, causes him to lose weight.

GERALD McBOING BOING ON PLANET MOO (1956)
The King of Planet Moo is anxious to establish a tourism trade with Earth people, so he opens a channel of communication with the first Earthling he encounters: Gerald McBoing Boing.

THE JAYWALKER (1956)
Milton Muffet details his obsession with jaywalking, which started as a hobby but became an avocation and, finally, his whole life.

TREES AND JAMAICA DADDY (1958)
Two stories in one: Hattie presents a song about trees, while Ham and his friends sing a calypso song called "Jamaica Daddy."

SAILING AND VILLAGE BAND (1958)
Two stories in one: Hattie presents a song about sailing as she floats a boat in a small fountain, while Ham takes part in a four-piece band which is ignored until the town needs to greet a visiting dignitary.

SPRING AND SAGANAKI (1959)
Two stories in one: Hattie presents a song about Spring, while Ham acts out the story of Saganaki, a Japanese wood-cutter who dreams of being a Samurai warrior.

PICNICS ARE FUN & DINO’S SERENADE (1959)
Two stories in one: Hattie presents a song about picnics as she enjoys one on a big-city rooftop, while Ham acts out the story of Dino, who imagines serenading a young lady on his violin.
 
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